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As usual, this week's prizes are listed at the end.

Holiday Contest Week 2 Results
Congratulations to Enalla! She's won a greyscale portrait, 200 dA points, and a journal feature. The random drawing results are posted here.

My favorite cat humor link was sent to me by Michelle-JP. For this, she's won 100 points. If you're curious about what had me laughing like a crazy person, check it out here.

Holiday Contest Week 3

RULES (These are the exact same ones that were posted last week and apply to every week for this contest.)
1) Watchers only, please.
2) There will be four separate raffles:
1st- Starts now (12/2) Closes (12/8) Winner announced (12/9)
2nd- Starts (12/9) Closes (12/15) Winner announced (12/16)
3rd- Starts (12/16) Closes (12/22) Winner announced (12/23)
4th- Starts (12/23) Closes (12/31). Winner announced on New Years Day.
3) Only one entry per person, per week. If you don't win this week, feel free to enter again next week when this week's winner is randomly chosen.
4) You must answer the questions posted for that week to be entered. Just commenting "eNter me Plz" isn't going to cut it. (Come on. I think I'm making this pretty easy already...)
5) Don't worry about assigning raffle numbers to each of your answers. I'll take care of assigning you a number in a response comment.
6) Winners will be announced in the same journal entry that announces the questions and prizes for the following week's raffle.
7) The prizes get bigger every week. As stated earlier, you can be the winner for only one week's raffle. This means you can't win the larger prizes in later weeks if you've already won a previous week's [smaller] prizes. I won't be announcing any of the prizes ahead of their week either, so the gamble of when to start entering is up to you.


THIS WEEK'S QUESTION There's only one question this week because it requires a little extra thought. A brief explanation of your answer would be awesome.

1) In your opinion, what is the difference (if there is one) between the definition of "fangirl" and "fanboy"? Does it only designate gender? Or do you feel that each indicates a separate set of behaviors? For example, can a female be a "fanboy" when she passionately argues what the intentions were of the creator of her favorite TV show? Can a male "fangirl" over a character that he finds attractive or fascinating? Or will the former always be a "fangirl" and the latter always a "fanboy" due to their gender?

I don't think there's only one correct answer, so please don't feel like it's possible to get this "wrong." I'm just curious about what you guys think.

THIS WEEK'S PRIZES
•A journal feature for you and/or your group
•One greyscale portrait, with colorsplash if desired
•300 dA points
•A 1 month subscription to dA
Add a Comment:
 
:iconthreshthesky:
ThreshTheSky Featured By Owner Dec 22, 2012  Hobbyist General Artist
COMMENTS/ENTRIES FOR WEEK 3 ARE NOW CLOSED. Entry requests posted after this comment will not be included in this week's drawing.
Reply
:iconthreshthesky:
ThreshTheSky Featured By Owner Dec 22, 2012  Hobbyist General Artist
Entries will close in three hours.
Reply
:iconalatusaquae:
AlatusAquae Featured By Owner Dec 21, 2012
Interesting question. The vast majority of my friends are female, so I've never really had any opportunity to use or think about the term 'fanboy.' But I think for some reason it'll feel less weird to call a guy a fangirl than vice versa. Maybe that's just because I'm not as familiar with typical fanboy behavior, while if a guy emits a high pitched squeal that's pretty fangirl behavior. But overall, I would determine it on the gender of the fan definitely. I call it fangirling when my friend is stalking two million pictures of a male actor, I call it fangirling when I fill my tumblr with pictures of female actresses, and I call it fangirling when I'm debating with my friend over which character is truly evil and to blame for everything that's going wrong in the show. Mostly just because me and my friends are all girls and I would feel weird calling us fanboys.
Reply
:iconthreshthesky:
ThreshTheSky Featured By Owner Dec 21, 2012  Hobbyist General Artist
Interesting. Just goes to show how much peoples' ideas of the terms can differ based on experience and opinion. :)

Thanks for entering! You have ticket 22.
Reply
:iconbistraja:
Bistraja Featured By Owner Dec 19, 2012  Hobbyist Digital Artist
I have never thought of it that way, to define fangirl and fanboy by anything other than gender, hmmm. I actually haven't seen fanboy being used that much either so I haven't even seen the difference of peoples usage xD
But now that I think of it, I would still not think of them with different sorts of behavior, just to show gender :)
Reply
:iconthreshthesky:
ThreshTheSky Featured By Owner Dec 19, 2012  Hobbyist General Artist
Thanks for the comment! You have ticket 21.
Reply
:iconspadiekitchenqueen:
spadiekitchenqueen Featured By Owner Dec 18, 2012  Hobbyist Writer
I thought at first that fangirls could only fangirl about guys, hence making girls be able to be both fangirls and fanboys, when fanning over female characters, but the more I think about it, the more I think it doens't really make sense. Fanboy/ fangirl, same thing. I swear my friend can squeal louder than me when he fangasms over something anyway! :D
Reply
:iconthreshthesky:
ThreshTheSky Featured By Owner Dec 18, 2012  Hobbyist General Artist
Good point! Thanks for the comment. You have entry 20. :)
Reply
:iconjaeevershade:
JaeEvershade Featured By Owner Dec 18, 2012  Hobbyist General Artist
That's something I never really thought of. I always assumed they meant the same thing, but only differentiate gender. I suppose it's general but boys could be included in a group that would be predominately female and be called fangirls, and vise versa? I don't know.
Reply
:iconthreshthesky:
ThreshTheSky Featured By Owner Dec 18, 2012  Hobbyist General Artist
Thanks for the comment! You have ticket 19.
Reply
:iconburlew:
Burlew Featured By Owner Dec 17, 2012  Hobbyist Digital Artist
I've never really been sufficiently knowledgeable about that sort of thing, but I always assumed it was just for slightly obsessed fans of whichever gender.
Reply
:iconthreshthesky:
ThreshTheSky Featured By Owner Dec 17, 2012  Hobbyist General Artist
Thanks for entering! You have slot 18.
Reply
:iconv-o-l-t-a-i-c:
V-o-L-T-a-i-C Featured By Owner Dec 17, 2012  Professional Writer
Hm, I've only ever used either or to differentiate the gender of a fan. I think that "fangirls" are just as passionate about their fandoms as "fanboys" and vice versa. A fangirl can just as aptly debate a plot point or character development or otherwise creator intentions just as well as a fanboy. I don't think either term should cast more or less positive or negative light on the person that it has been applied to. Besides, I know just as many boys that do the whole "squee!/kawaii!" thing that "fangirls" are stereotypically known for :XD:
Reply
:iconthreshthesky:
ThreshTheSky Featured By Owner Dec 17, 2012  Hobbyist General Artist
I'm inclined to agree. :)

Thanks for entering! You have ticket 17.
Reply
:iconrutana:
Rutana Featured By Owner Dec 17, 2012  Student Writer
I never really thought about this. Always assuming that it's just a gender driven name. But the more I think about it, the more I see it differently.
Now I would define it by their actions, not the gender.
Fangirl for me means to act very girly. Having a crush, squeeking about every little thing, do the weirdest shippings of your fandom, ... that's fangirling behaviour for me. Loving a Fandom in the imaginary way.
While Fanboys are probably more calmed down. They still love everything about their fandom, but are more looking into the overdiscussing, collecting part of beeing a fan. Beiing more a realistic way of fan, as in pulling the fandom to the reality more then yourself into the fandom in imagination.
And beeing a Fan, not a fangirl or fanboy, would mean a good mixture of both parts?

Don't know if that really makes sense... XD
But I would go with this.
Reply
:iconthreshthesky:
ThreshTheSky Featured By Owner Dec 17, 2012  Hobbyist General Artist
You made perfect sense. :) I'm inclined to generally agree with the differences you pointed out.

Thank you for entering! You have ticket 16.
Reply
:icontrygubova:
Trygubova Featured By Owner Dec 16, 2012
I think there is a difference between a fangirl and a fanboy... and it is not their genders. Therefore a boy may be a fangirl and a girl can be a fanboy. My thought behind this is basically the terms fangirl and fanboy came to be stereotypical personifications of an action.

For example a stereotypical girl is one who may talk at the speed of lightening about any subject. She is energetic and lively about a subject, someone who is known to all. Therefore using the term fangirl to describe someone probably means that they are very vocal and excited over a certain subject. Everyone would recognize a fan girl when they see one as she has a hard time containing her excitement about the subject from others.

On the second hand we have a fanboy. Boys usually try to play it cool or rather they are not energetic about a subject as much as a girl is. Therefore calling a one a fanboy means they do like a subject but it may not be all that obvious to others.

And there you have my rant about fans. I hope you enjoy your day and I actually had fun thinking on this one. :la:
Reply
:iconthreshthesky:
ThreshTheSky Featured By Owner Dec 17, 2012  Hobbyist General Artist
I have slightly different thoughts on the actual definition of each term but when you said "the terms fangirl and fanboy came to be stereotypical personifications of an action," I brushed off my hands, threw them in the air, and thought, "It can't be said better than that." Fantastically put. :)

Thank you for the awesome response! I'm glad you enjoyed the question. You have ticket 15.
Reply
:iconcoolbananacake:
coolbananacake Featured By Owner Dec 16, 2012
1) In your opinion, what is the difference (if there is one) between the definition of "fangirl" and "fanboy"? Does it only designate gender? Or do you feel that each indicates a separate set of behaviors? For example, can a female be a "fanboy" when she passionately argues what the intentions were of the creator of her favorite TV show? Can a male "fangirl" over a character that he finds attractive or fascinating? Or will the former always be a "fangirl" and the latter always a "fanboy" due to their gender?

I think there is no particular difference as such of fanboy and fangirl, it is just so boys and girls have different titles (because really, what male would want to be called a fangirl?) but there are d3finately different types of fans. There are the fans who love the 'object of fantism' and obsess over the characters and how awesome they are, that's the typical fan. But there is also a type of fan that is very serious about it, a fan who examines the plot and characters and whatnot and isn't afraid to admit that there are flaws while still loving it. To be honest i am a bit of both, and generally do use fangirl and fanboy to refer to the different types of fans, just because I don't want to explain the whole spiel and most people understand the stereotype.
PS> if you don't agree with me, I didn't mean to offend you :)
Reply
:iconthreshthesky:
ThreshTheSky Featured By Owner Dec 17, 2012  Hobbyist General Artist
"if you don't agree with me, I didn't mean to offend you"

Not at all! For me, the very possibility of heated discussion is the appeal of this sort of question. There's a lot that I could go into regarding "what male would want to be called a fangirl," but I'll spare you the rant. ;)

Thanks for entering! You have ticket 14.
Reply
:iconcoolbananacake:
coolbananacake Featured By Owner Dec 22, 2012
by male, i mean the vast majority. I have a lot of guy friends who call themselves fangirls, but then there are the guys like the idiotic ones in my class who think pink is only for girls, and that girls aren't allowed to wear shorts and whatnot. Really, for such a rhetorical question (such as what male would want to be called a fangirl) it has many many answers. I also love debates, I really want to join the debate club at my school :)
Reply
:icongnewi:
Gnewi Featured By Owner Dec 16, 2012  Hobbyist General Artist
Oh, my! I am afraid my answer will be pretty short compared to the above answers!

I have always thought of "fangirl/fanboy" as a term to define an obsessed fan, and the only difference being the gender of said obsessee... I honestly have never considered any deeper meaning. These comments and your question are very interesting... food for thought. XD
Reply
:iconthreshthesky:
ThreshTheSky Featured By Owner Dec 17, 2012  Hobbyist General Artist
Haha. No problem. I'm glad to hear your opinion. :)

Thanks for answering! You have ticket 13.
Reply
:icondefenderofdarkness48:
Defenderofdarkness48 Featured By Owner Dec 16, 2012  Student Filmographer
1) In your opinion, what is the difference (if there is one) between the definition of "fangirl" and "fanboy"? Does it only designate gender? Or do you feel that each indicates a separate set of behaviors? For example, can a female be a "fanboy" when she passionately argues what the intentions were of the creator of her favorite TV show? Can a male "fangirl" over a character that he finds attractive or fascinating? Or will the former always be a "fangirl" and the latter always a "fanboy" due to their gender?

I honestly had no idea there was such a thing as 'fanboy' So I'll have to say that it doesn't matter. I myself refer to anything regarding an obsession in any way fangirling, no matter what it is.
Reply
:iconthreshthesky:
ThreshTheSky Featured By Owner Dec 17, 2012  Hobbyist General Artist
Thanks for your response. You have ticket 12. :)
Reply
:iconlesmisphangirl:
LesMisPhangirl Featured By Owner Dec 16, 2012  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
Two answers.
For me, I don't think there really is any difference {besides gender}.
For the internet, a fangirl is someone who jumps around like a maniac and wallpapers their room with posters while swooning every five seconds over whoever or what ever they're fanning over and collecting every t-shirt known to mankind that has that thing or person on it or can be related to that thing or person in some way, and a fanboy is someone who gets incredibly technical in their fandom and has to know every last little fact about that thing or person, no matter how small or insignificant the fact is, and their room is usually filled with a whole lot of smaller trinkets like action figures and such. A fangirl, according to the internet, when you "hate" on what they fan over, will smack you and start crying and call you "just a hater" and then go hug all their posters. A fanboy, according to the internet, will, instead, burn holes through you with their eyes and then proceed to argue with you up and down about whatever they fan over, using all the little facts they found to "prove" what or whom they fan over is actually "epic." And that you're probably "just a hater."
Yup...
Reply
:iconthreshthesky:
ThreshTheSky Featured By Owner Dec 17, 2012  Hobbyist General Artist
I feel a little uncomfortable with the implications that the difference between the terms carries, but you defined them perfectly. This is essentially how I've come to think of a "fanboy" and a "fangirl" too.

Thanks for the awesome response! You have ticket 11.
Reply
:iconlesmisphangirl:
LesMisPhangirl Featured By Owner Dec 18, 2012  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
I don't like the differences either, but that's how it seems to be written all over the internet. :/
No problem! Thank you! :D
Reply
:iconcoolbananacake:
coolbananacake Featured By Owner Dec 16, 2012
preach sister, preach it! XD
Reply
:iconlesmisphangirl:
LesMisPhangirl Featured By Owner Dec 18, 2012  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
XD
Reply
:iconthreshthesky:
ThreshTheSky Featured By Owner Dec 17, 2012  Hobbyist General Artist
Right?! Awesome answer! :D
Reply
:iconmichelle-jp:
Michelle-JP Featured By Owner Dec 16, 2012  Hobbyist General Artist
1) In your opinion, what is the difference (if there is one) between the definition of "fangirl" and "fanboy"? Does it only designate gender? Or do you feel that each indicates a separate set of behaviors? For example, can a female be a "fanboy" when she passionately argues what the intentions were of the creator of her favorite TV show? Can a male "fangirl" over a character that he finds attractive or fascinating? Or will the former always be a "fangirl" and the latter always a "fanboy" due to their gender?

-I don't think there is a difference, really. Both words convey that either a male or a female are a fan of something or someone. The degree to which extent they are a "fan" varies with each person.
Some people are very passionate fans to the extent that they know everything about the person or thing they admire. To the extent of becoming obsessions.
On the other side of the coin there's the people who like the character or person and they really like him/her but they spend little time investigating about that specific person or character. They might just admire their work or what they do.

Take for example me. I like many things and I admire many people that work on different things. But, I don't know much about them, really. I think that everyone in entitled to privacy regardless of who they are and what they do.
I suppose it must be flattering to have so many people be your fans but quite honestly, I would never want that for myself.

But, going back to your question. I think the terms fangirl and fanboy are just a way to describe someone who has strong feelings of admiration toward someone or something.
Reply
:iconthreshthesky:
ThreshTheSky Featured By Owner Dec 17, 2012  Hobbyist General Artist
Interesting idea. Thanks for the response! You're entry 10.
Reply
:iconmichelle-jp:
Michelle-JP Featured By Owner Dec 17, 2012  Hobbyist General Artist
Thank you for doing this, dear~ :hug:
Reply
:iconstarlene:
Starlene Featured By Owner Dec 16, 2012  Hobbyist General Artist
I would like to think you just use the word that suits the person's gender the best. That fangirl, fanboy, whatever, they're words for the same thing and can mean both discussing the subject and drooling after beautiful people, and everything in between.

But, when I see the words being used, I do see some of what you've described, that fanboying means a different thing than fangirling. I certainly dislike what it implies. That it's not feminine behaviour to get into nerdy arguments, or not manly if you giggle about whoever it is you like? Nah. Personally, I don't want to use the words like that.

(By the way - in Finland, we just say "fanittaa", when we mean the verb "to fanboy/fangirl". I like that.)
Reply
:iconthreshthesky:
ThreshTheSky Featured By Owner Dec 17, 2012  Hobbyist General Artist
"I certainly dislike what it implies."

This is the thought path that I was starting to go down before I posed this question. I'd like to think of the two terms as the same thing, but the way they're typically used seems to suggest that most people don't (even if it's on a subconscious level). I completely agree that the difference in terms carries highly unfortunate implications.

You're the first person who's really dived into the possible sexism of the definitions. Thanks so much for your response. :) You have ticket 9.
Reply
:iconguineveretogwen:
GuinevereToGwen Featured By Owner Dec 16, 2012  Student Writer
In my opinion, both are the same thing. Gender is the only difference. Both can find a character attractive/fascinating or find the intentions of the creator arguable. However, it does seem that girls tend more to do the former, from my experience. I don't really know any guys who would "fangirl" about something; they seem to argue about things other than which character is cutest. I've been spending a lot more time with guys than I have with girls, lately. :P
Reply
:iconthreshthesky:
ThreshTheSky Featured By Owner Dec 17, 2012  Hobbyist General Artist
"I don't really know any guys who would "fangirl" about something"

I agree. But the very fact that we call a certain behavior "fangirling" intend of "fanboying" is very telling. I'd like to think of them as the same thing, but the way we use them seems to suggest differently.

Thanks for entering! You have ticket 8.
Reply
:iconuirukii:
Uirukii Featured By Owner Dec 16, 2012  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
To me, both are the same and have the exact same potential to be uber-psycho crazy or just passionate fans. I don't know if you watch the Big Bang Theory, but all the characters are major "fanboys" that collect all sorts of merchandise, have conversations about their favourite worlds and characters, and every so often get a little creepy obsessive (like when they went all nutso for the Ring from LotR). We girls do the same thing; collect, draw, discuss, etc. And as for both, there are both fangirls and fanboys that get a little out of hand (John Lennon's death, others who bombard actors with pic of their OTP, etc).
Reply
:iconthreshthesky:
ThreshTheSky Featured By Owner Dec 17, 2012  Hobbyist General Artist
I do watch BBT, and the episode where they find the lost prop ring from LotR is one of my favorites. XD

Thanks for entering! You have ticket 7.
Reply
:iconpaintingadream:
PaintingADream Featured By Owner Dec 16, 2012  Hobbyist Digital Artist
I don't think that there really is a difference between a fangirl and a fanboy. I believe that they basically mean the same thing, to be obsessed with a person, of the same or opposite gender. Usually the people they are obsessed with are from sports, television, film directors, video games, manga/comic characters etc. I associate fangirls with being more "obsessive" to the point of stalking the person, going to see them when and if at all possible, knowing everything about them, watching all of their games/shows/concerts/etc., and pretending to be their wife. I view fanboys as the more toned down version of fangirls, while still stalking the person but not to as an extreme level, and keeping their obsession more to themselves. I think that it honestly will stay the same no matter what the gender, so if a girl is obsessed with another girl, they would still be called a fangirl, instead of a fanboy. I think the word of gender attached to the end was just to distinguish between who it was that was obsessed with the person; a boy or a girl, but it honestly doesn't matter in the long run. :shrug:
Reply
:iconthreshthesky:
ThreshTheSky Featured By Owner Dec 17, 2012  Hobbyist General Artist
I don't think it matters in the long run either. But I've noticed over time the difference in the way that people tend to use the words and wanted to get some other peoples' opinions on the matter.

Thanks for entering! You have ticket 6.
Reply
:icontazzilynumeral:
Tazzilynumeral Featured By Owner Dec 16, 2012
Huh, this is a really interesting question!

For me, I've always thought fangirl/boy just designated gender, with the girls implied to have more shrieking and slightly obsessive behavior like putting up thousands of posters, while a fanboy is thought to stalk a celebrity or fandom in a slightly more credpy fashion... If that makes sense. XD I'm going to go think this over for a bit longer...
Reply
:iconthreshthesky:
ThreshTheSky Featured By Owner Dec 17, 2012  Hobbyist General Artist
That definitely makes sense. :)

Thanks for entering! You're ticket 5.
Reply
:icontazzilynumeral:
Tazzilynumeral Featured By Owner Dec 17, 2012
Thank you! :)
Reply
:iconfelixuta:
Felixuta Featured By Owner Dec 16, 2012  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
I must admit I wouldn't have expected that one in a million years ^^;

Well lets see...Fanboys and fangirls are the same thing,the only thing that differentiates them is the gender. Usually,the term of fan boy/girl gets from their admiration,passion and love for a certain celebrity (but it's not required for the person to be a celebrity...He/she could be the person living next door for example) that with time turns into obsession. Don't blame me,but I've always been a bit frightened by some actions taken by some fanboys or fangirls from all around the globe. I find it hard to believe and creepy when a fanboy tried to kill a celebrity because he loves her so much that he can't stand not to be with her. Or another example,I don't remember exactly,but there was a famous band that had retired and because of that, some fanboys and fangirls, tried to kill them because they cannot live without their music.
It's okay to be a fan. But not in extreme ways.
Reply
:iconthreshthesky:
ThreshTheSky Featured By Owner Dec 17, 2012  Hobbyist General Artist
I think about random, non-consequential questions like this all the time. I wanted to see what you guys thought about this one. :)

Thanks for the comment! You're ticket #4.
Reply
:iconfelixuta:
Felixuta Featured By Owner Dec 17, 2012  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
Haha It's a natural thing dear :pat:

Thank you too :D
Reply
:iconmirz-alt:
mirz-alt Featured By Owner Dec 16, 2012   General Artist
Provocative question. I'll admit, sometimes I use them just to equate gender. However, thinking about it, I do use them differently, as well.

A fanboy is someone who generally likes a fandom. Such as I am a fanboy of the Batman universe and love all that it entails, from movies to comics, to the characters. I have fanboys of my own series--the people who must read the chapters the day they come out, comment on everything, know all of the nuances.

A fangirl is typically someone who has a romantic interest in a work or an OC. I don't think the phrase is derrogatory from a gender POV, but likens back to the days of the Beatles, where you had scenes of dozens of squeeing and crying girls looking up at the musicians. I have used the phrase to describe both males and females who like certain OCs. Again, just with my personal experience, I have called guys "fangirls" who happen to be digging my male characters (boy on boy). I also have one male read who is a total fangirl for Sara. Of course, I have quite a few female fans who fangirl over my male OCs.

Anyhow, again, interesting question. Congrats to last week's winner.
Reply
:iconthreshthesky:
ThreshTheSky Featured By Owner Dec 17, 2012  Hobbyist General Artist
I had always thought of them as the same thing and only really used the two terms to denote the gender of the person in question. But then something I was reading (I don't even remember what it was now) got me thinking about how each word tends to have different suggestions about that person's behavior. Calling someone who argues over how dilithium crystals work a "fangirl" doesn't feel right, even if she's female.

I think some of it may come down to tendencies (or at least assumptions about tendencies) about who's into what fandoms. You don't hear much about people fangirling over any Star Wars characters, but the term "fanboy" is thrown around all the time. The same goes for the Star Trek example I gave before. I'm honestly not sure how I feel about this conclusion. I'm usually one of the first people to not like these sort of assumptions. And not wanting to call someone who's into the technical side of a fandom a fangirl does make me uncomfortable. Maybe I just haven't thought about it enough.

Anyway, thanks for the enlightening response. You're entry 3. :)
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